The Importance Of Cybersecurity For Manufacturing Firms

As the manufacturing world becomes more and more digital, cybersecurity becomes more and more important. Do you know how vital cybersecurity for manufacturing firms is?

Your manufacturing company has a lot of moving parts. And if yours is like most, you increasingly rely on technology to keep the lines moving.

With the increase and diversification of consumer needs today, there’s a constant requirement to improve everything from order taking to shipping while keeping your IT systems secure. Your IT services company should be supporting that effort – are they?

It would be best to make sure that consumers’ needs and desires are met, but there are new and severe dangers from the increase in the number of cybersecurity attacks. No firm is immune. Whether you run a large or small manufacturing firm, you could be the victim of a cyberattack. Malware, phishing scams, and ransomware are the major ways you might be attacked.

How Important Is Cybersecurity For Manufacturing Firms?

Is it possible for you to be too small to be a target for cybercriminals?

The news may lead you to believe so, but it’s simply not an accurate representation of the cybercrime industry.

The truth? In almost half of all the cyber breaches in recent years, a small business was the target. As reported in Verizon’s Data Breach Report and Forbes

  • 58% of all breaches in 2018 involved small businesses.
  • 43% of all breaches involved small businesses in 2019.
  • Ransomware attacks are still going strong, accounting for 24% of the malware incidents analyzed, and is the #2 most-used malware type.

“To a hacker, you’re just an IP address, and all addresses get attacked with roughly the same frequency,” said Peter Adams, vice president of business strategy at Aldrich Technology, to Oregon Business. “Two thousand attacks per minute is average for our clients. It doesn’t matter the company. It’s automated. It’s not somebody.”

The fact is that your data has value. It doesn’t matter how big you are. Your small size often means that you’re easier to hack because you don’t have the resources or experience needed to protect yourself. That’s why you should outsource your protection with cybersecurity for manufacturing firms.

What’s The Key To Cybersecurity For Manufacturing Firms?

The good news is that you don’t have to figure out cybersecurity from scratch – the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed the Cybersecurity Framework Manufacturing Profile, detailing each aspect of a proper cybersecurity defense for manufacturing firms.

Detect

Develop and implement the appropriate activities to identify the occurrence of a cybersecurity event. The activities in the Detect Function enable the timely discovery of cybersecurity events. Examples of outcome Categories within this function include Anomalies and Events; Security Continuous Monitoring; and Detection Processes.

Protect

Develop and implement the appropriate safeguards to ensure the delivery of critical infrastructure services. The Protect Function activities support the ability to limit or contain the impact of a potential cybersecurity event. Examples of outcome Categories within this function include Access Control, Awareness, and Training; Data Security; Information Protection Processes and Procedures; Maintenance; and Protective Technology.

Identify

Develop the organizational understanding to manage cybersecurity risk to systems, assets, data, and capabilities. The activities in the Identify Function are foundational for effective use of the Framework. Understanding the business context, the resources that support critical functions, and the related cybersecurity risks enable an organization to focus and prioritize its efforts, consistent with its risk management strategy and business needs.

Examples of outcome Categories within this function include Asset Management, Business Environment; Governance; Risk Assessment; and Risk Management Strategy.

Respond

Develop and implement the appropriate activities to take action regarding a detected cybersecurity event. The activities in the Respond Function support the ability to contain the impact of a potential cybersecurity event. Examples of outcome Categories within this Function include Response Planning; Communications; Analysis; Mitigation, and Improvements.

Recover

Develop and implement the appropriate activities to maintain plans for resilience and to restore any capabilities or services that were impaired due to a cybersecurity event. The Recover Function activities support timely recovery to normal operations to reduce the impact of a cybersecurity event. Examples of outcome Categories within this Function include Recovery Planning; Improvements, and Communications.

What’s The Key To Cybersecurity For Manufacturing Firms?

Invest in a little expert protection – SureTec. We will put our big business cybersecurity expertise to work for you, implementing best practices, identifying vulnerabilities, and protecting you against the more common and dangerous cybercrime scams.

Nick Hess

Nick Hess is an authority for IT services in Portland, OR. Nick's team at SureTec IT has helped numerous companies with their day-to-day IT service needs. Nick also has years of experience with Google G Suite, Microsoft 365, and business VoIP Services.

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